August 2019 Client Newsletter

Here’s our August 2019 client newsletter.

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Avoid Plumbing Failures

One of the services offered by Professional Carpet Systems is water damage restoration. In the event of a water intrusion in your home or business, time is a key factor in minimizing damage. But there are things that you can do to prevent a water disaster from happening in the first place.

Plumbing system failures are by far the single largest cause of residential water damage insurance claims. Water begins to damage certain materials like drywall, baseboards, hardwood floors and furniture almost immediately causing serious issues. The Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety (IBHS) urges property owners to inspect interior plumbing components and complete preventive maintenance measures to reduce chances of interior water damage.

IBHS conducted a study of water damage insurance claims, identified five leading causes of damage, and developed the solutions featured below.

1. PLUMBING SUPPLY SYSTEM FAILURE–The average cost of a plumbing supply system failure was more than $5,000 after the insurance deductible was paid, according to the IBHS study. Potential indicators of a plumbing problem include increasing water bills, banging pipes, rust stains, moisture on walls or floors, and signs of wet soil near the foundation. If you see any of these signs, or you suspect something is not right, call a plumber as soon as possible for a system inspection.

2. TOILET FAILURE–One-third of all toilet failures in the study resulted from an overflowing toilet. After you flush, wait for the valve to completely finish refilling the tank and bowl. If an overflow looks imminent, turn off the supply valve. Twice a year, inspect a toilet’s components, such as the fill, supply and flush valves, and the supply line. Consider upgrading the toilet’s supply line to a sturdier braided steel hose.

3. WATER HEATER FAILURE–The most common causes of water heater failures in the IBHS study were a slow leak or a sudden burst in the tank, closely followed by supply line failures. Check the life expectancy and warranty for the water heater and replace accordingly. Proper maintenance, such as flushing sediments and inspecting the heater’s anode rod, can increase life expectancy. You should also inspect valves to ensure proper operations, and use ball valves in place of gate valves whenever possible.

4. PLUMBING DRAIN SYSTEM FAILURE–The IBHS study found more than half of plumbing system failures were the direct result of sewer backups. If the home’s sewer system is connected to the city’s sewer system or if you are located downhill or below street level, contact a plumbing professional to install a back-flow prevention assembly into the home’s sewer system.

5. WASHING MACHINE FAILURE–One burst inlet hose, and your laundry room is flooded in a matter of minutes, with water quickly spreading to other rooms and adjacent areas. Replace rubber hoses every three years and consider upgrading to sturdier braided steel hoses. When leaving the house for an extended period of time, turn off the hot and cold water supply valve to reduce failure risks.

Don’t try to cut corners by overloading the machine, and use it only while someone is at home. Pass this information along to your friends and neighbors and remember to call Professional Carpet Systems if you should ever have a water intrusion.

Client Newsletter July 2019

This is our client newsletter for July 2019.

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Home Fire Safety Guide

The Fourth of July is one of the busiest days of the year for house fires. Sure, it’s a celebration and, yes, fireworks are traditional and they can be used safely. Nonetheless, nearly 20,000 fires annually are blamed on fireworks, according to the National Fire Protection Association. Even the most common fireworks, such as a sparkler, can start a fire.

You think it will never happen to you, but it makes sense to be prepared. The most important thing you can do is to have working smoke detectors on every level of your home. An early warning is your best defense against a house fire. Taking the right steps in the event of a house fire could save your home and even your life. Make sure that all adults and older children understand how to RACE and PASS if there is a fire. This doesn’t mean RACE around the house in a panic and PASS your spouse on your way out the door! RACE and PASS are simply memory aids for what you should do in case of a fire.

R.A.C.E.

R is for Remove. Remove all occupants from the area of the fire.

A is for Alert. Alert the authorities; call 911. C is for Contain. Close windows and doors to contain and smother the fire.

E is for Extinguish or Evacuate. Which one? That depends on the stage of the fire.

A house fire goes through 4 stages:

Stage 1: Incipient. The fire is just starting and there is a good chance of extinguishing it.

Stage 2: Growth. The fire spreads to other combustible materials. You should evacuate.

Stage 3: Developed. The hottest, most deadly stage; evacuation is your primary objective.

Stage 4: Decay. The fire is running out of fuel or oxygen but still smolders; a deadly backdraft is possible.

If the fire is beyond the incipient stage and spreading rapidly, you should evacuate and let the fire department handle it. If you are confident that you can safely extinguish the fire, do so only after you have gotten people out of the area, called 911 and contained the fire if possible. Make sure you have an escape route. Then use a portable fire extinguisher to put out the fire using the PASS method.

P.A.S.S.

P is for Pull. Pull the pin out of the handle. A is for Aim. Aim the nozzle at the base of the fire. S is for Squeeze. Squeeze the handle to discharge the extinguisher. S is for Sweep. Sweep from side to side at the base of the fire.

Keep portable fire extinguishers in strategic locations of your home such as the kitchen, utility areas, garage and storage rooms.

After a home has suffered even a small fire, proper cleanup needs to be done. There may be fire extinguisher residue, charred materials and smoke residue to clean up. Water-damaged contents, floors, walls and structural materials need to be dried and cleaned. Strong, lingering odors often require a combination of techniques for successful treatment.

We hope you never have this happen in your home, but if you do, Professional Carpet Systems can help or refer you to someone else who can.

 

 

June 2019 Client Newsletter.

Here’s our June 2019 newsletter.

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Safety FIRST During a Disaster

If your home or business is affected by fire, flood, storm or biological contamination, your first instinct may be to minimize the damage. This is understandable, since so much of your life is tied up in the places you live and work. However, this natural reaction could prove costly or even deadly.

As difficult as it may be in the heat of the moment, we must remember safety first. Some common hazards in a water or fire damage situation are slip and fall, compromised or unstable structure, electrical hazards, gas leaks and biological contamination. If your home or business should ever suffer a disaster, use the following suggestions to avoid injury, illness or worse.

Slipping and falling is the most common cause of injuries. When water enters a building from a storm, plumbing failure or fighting a fire, it presents a hazard to people walking in and around the affected areas. Walking from wet carpet onto hard surface flooring is a common example. Just a small amount of residual water on your shoes can make a hard surface floor slippery and dangerous. It is best to stay out of the affected areas if possible. If that is not an option, soak up any small puddles that you can. Walk slowly and carefully from carpet to hard floors. Post warning signs. Use absorbent mats where possible.

Electricity and water are a dangerous combination. If water enters an electrical panel, switch or outlet, electrical current can “leak” out to the surface and present a serious shock hazard. Pools of standing water are always especially dangerous.

Appliances sitting in pooled water can leak electrical current into the water. Standing in that water and touching any conductive material could result in a serious shock. Stay away from deep standing water and let the professionals deal with turning off the power. Drywall loses its strength when it becomes wet. Saturated drywall ceilings present a major safety hazard. The ceiling may look fine and then suddenly fall without warning. If the ceiling is sagging, assume that a collapse is imminent and stay out of the area. Leave it up to the professionals to drain and remove the ceiling safely.

Water from unsanitary sources can carry biological contamination, creating a serious health risk. This is obvious with a sewage backflow, but it can also be a factor in other water sources. Water that runs over the ground, has been standing for over 48 hours or from other sources like aquariums contain a significant degree of contamination and have the potential to cause sickness or discomfort through physical contact or accidental ingestion.

Simply touching your eyes, nose or mouth could invite bacteria and some viruses to cause illness. Avoid contact with all unsanitary water. If you do contact contaminated water, wash all skin exposed to the water. If it is splashed into your eyes, repeatedly flush with water for 15 minutes and seek medical attention.

Other hazards such as gas leaks, carbon monoxide, chemicals, toxic materials such as asbestos and lead, weakened structural materials and possible exposure to mold or other pollutants could harm occupants and workers. Your home or business is important, but not as important as your health and safety.

Professional Carpet Systems invests not only in technical training, but safety training as well. When you call us, you can be assured that we will handle your disaster restoration in a safe and healthy manner.

May 2019 Client Newsletter

Here’s our May 2019 client newsletter.

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Keep Dirt Outside

All through the year we track various soils into our homes. Not only that, pollutants from car exhaust, pollens, pet and human dander, and just plain old dirt can damage surfaces in your home including carpet, tile, wood, upholstery and fabrics. Soil control is an important part of keeping your home clean and healthy.

You can control soil by limiting the entrance and buildup of contaminants inside your home. The best way to control soil inside your home is to prevent its entry. They say that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure; it takes 12 times more effort, time and money to remove soil as it does to prevent it from ever entering inside a structure. Remember that whatever is outside tends to come in, so consider the following: Keep walkways, steps and porches clean and free of dirt, mold, moss and algae.

Maintain garage floors in order to prevent oil, road grime and other contaminants from being tracked indoors. Place doormats both outside and inside all of the entrances to your home. Outdoor mats should be a water resistant, synthetic, non-absorbent fiber such as olefin or polypropylene and be textured to scrape heavy soils off your shoes. Avoid natural fibers which tend to mold and rot creating a new soil source for your home.

Inside doormats should be absorbent like nylon, cotton or wool. Vacuum and wash it periodically to remove built-up soils. Remove shoes when you come indoors, but don’t make the mistake of going barefoot all the time. The skin of our feet contains oils that attach to carpet and attract soil. Instead of going barefoot, wear clean house shoes, socks or slippers indoors.

Normal daily activities generate a variety of dust and residues that settle on just about every surface inside your home. Vacuuming is the most effective way to maintain your carpets. 74- 79% of soil in carpet is dry, particulate soil that can be removed by vacuuming. You should also vacuum your upholstered furniture, drapery and blinds for the same reasons. When you dust your furniture, do so gently, preferably with a duster attachment on your vacuum cleaner.

If you use a duster, go slow and allow dust to settle for an hour or so and vacuum the floor last. Your carpet can last a long time if properly cared for. Annual professional cleaning is recommended in most homes. Busy homes with children and pets require cleaning twice a year or more.

Don’t wait until your carpets, rugs and upholstery look dirty to have them cleaned by a professional; by the time fibers have reached a visibly soiled state they are already damaged. Call Professional Carpet Systems to learn more or schedule your next cleaning.

April 2019 Client Newsletter

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Mold, The Silent Pest

Say the word “pests” and people think about common household varieties such as ants, roaches, and spiders or even mice and rats. But did you know that molds are also considered pests? That’s right. Pests are generally defined as undesirable organisms that are detrimental to humans or human concerns.

Some molds produce gases called mycotoxins that can cause sickness and allergic reactions in humans. There are molds, such as wood-destroying fungi, that cause property damage. Children 2 years and younger are especially susceptible to mold-related illness. Serious complications can result from prolonged exposure. So it is good to know a few things about mold so you can avoid having a problem in your home.

Molds are fungi that feed on nonliving organic matter. In nature, mold and other fungi are responsible for breaking down dead leaves, plant material and wood. Mold derives energy from these materials by secreting enzymes that break them down into simpler compounds that the mold can absorb. This decomposition is a necessary part of Earth’s ecosystem.

Molds are ubiquitous; they are found everywhere. Some species of mold can survive in sub-freezing temperatures, while others will thrive in extremely high temperatures of the desert, gaining what little moisture is available from the air. Some molds can even grow on diesel fuel and other chemicals like anti-freeze. The two most common molds found in indoor living environments are Aspergillius and Penicillium. Given a food source, suitable temperature and elevated moisture or humidity, these molds can begin to grow and flourish on many surfaces within a home. Molds travel from one location to another by releasing microscopic, seed-like spores which can remain dormant for a very long time. When conditions are right, spores begin to grow into an active and growing mold colony.

Stachybotrys is another mold, often referred to as “toxic black mold”, which has gotten massive media attention. Stachybotrys is a sticky, slimy mold that grows on surfaces such as drywall, wood, and even paper on insulation. While Aspergillus and Penicillium can begin to grow in only a couple of days, Stachybotrys needs at least 7-12 days of constant moisture, warm temperatures around 70-80 degrees and minimal air movement. Therefore, you are most likely to encounter it in your home if you have an ongoing water intrusion from plumbing, foundation problems, roof or window leaks, etc. Note that you may not see it because it tends to flourish in dark, undisturbed areas. Since Stachybotrys is a sticky, slimy mold, the spores rarely become airborne. However, it may begin to release spores if it begins to dry out. It can also release mycotoxins into the air as a defense mechanism against other fungi.

Spores and mycotoxins can be transported into the breathable air of the home and create symptoms such as cough, headaches, asthma, rhinitis and other allergic reactions. In some cases, infants or others with underdeveloped or compromised immune systems can have serious, even life-threatening, pulmonary complications. If you have any type of mold in your home or business, it must be removed as soon as possible. The visible presence of any mold is an indicator that there may be more unseen mold hiding elsewhere.

Because mold can be harmful, call Professional Carpet Systems to identify the cause and develop a strategy to solve the problem and remove the mold.

March 2019 Client Newsletter

Here’s our March 2019 client newsletter.

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PROTECT YOUR HOME FROM ALLERGIES

Regular vacuuming is the most effective way to prolong the life of your carpets. By removing dry particles, you help prevent premature wear caused by abrasive soils grinding away at carpet fibers. A good quality vacuum cleaner does more than prevent abrasive damage to your carpet. The right vacuum also helps remove pollutants and contaminants from your home.

All vacuum cleaners use some kind of motor to turn fans that produce air flow. This airflow carries soils into a collection a canister or bag. The air must then be filtered before it is exhausted back into your home’s environment. This is the basic function of all vacuum cleaners. But not all vacuums are created equal. Some are better at filtering small particles than others.

Particles are measured in microns. A micron is one millionth of a meter. The smallest particle that the human eye can see is about 25 microns in diameter. Some vacuum cleaners filter particles as small as .3 microns. Many vacuum cleaners allow much larger particles to get through.

This is a problem, especially in homes with sensitive persons with allergies or asthma. The smallest particles are able to be breathed deeply into lung tissue where they cause irritation and inflammation. Coughing, wheezing and sneezing are the result. In some cases, full blown asthma attacks can happen.

What is in the dust that creates such big problems? Pollutants include mold, human and animal dander, dust mite feces, insect parts, air pollution, lead dust, carbon, cooking residues and more.

Pollutants are captured and filtered out by high quality vacuum cleaners featuring “true HEPA” filtration. HEPA, or High Efficiency Particulate Air filters, are tested and certified to trap 99.97% of all particles down to .3 microns.

A true HEPA vacuum cleaner actually cleans the air while it cleans the carpet. But be careful and do your homework. Just because a vacuum cleaner has a HEPA filter does not mean it is “true HEPA”.

Less efficient vacuum cleaners do not clean the air. Rather, they have the effect of expelling the smallest pollutant particles into the breathing zone where they can remain suspended for hours.

To get the most out of your vacuum cleaner it is important that it be properly maintained. If it has a replaceable bag, it should be exchanged when about half full.

Check the belts and make sure that the brushes or rollers are in good condition. It is best to take your machine in for an annual tune-up to keep it operating at peak performance.

When you vacuum do not rush over the surface of the carpet. Take your time. Vacuum over high traffic areas in two different directions to remove the most soil. This will help your carpets stay cleaner and last much longer.

Never vacuum up moist soils or damp carpet. This can cause bacterial growth and odors in your machine.

You need to maintain your carpet with regular, professional cleaning, but a good quality vacuum cleaner is your first line of defense in keeping a clean and healthy home. You don’t have to spend a fortune on a vacuum, but don’t skimp on quality either.

Call Professional Carpet Systems to learn more or schedule your next cleaning.

February 2019 Client Newsletter

Here’s our February 2019 client newsletter.

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Love Your Clean Carpet

On the surface, carpet cleaning seems pretty simple. Rent a machine. Fill the tank. Pour in some detergent. Flip a switch and start cleaning. Before long, your carpet is clean and fresh. However, as anyone who has actually cleaned carpet knows, there’s more to it than that. Here are some interesting facts about carpet that affect cleaning results.

Some of the most common questions asked about carpet cleaning are, “Will the spots come back?”, “Will the dents from the furniture come out?”, “Will the traffic areas look better after it’s done?”, and “Will these stains come out?”

The answers depend on several factors that we consider when we clean your carpet.

Carpet can be made with a variety of fibers, each having its own cleaning characteristics. Every ber responds to traf c differently. Spills that are easy to remove from one ber may permanently stain another.

Various styles such as loop pile, friezé, shag, Saxony and velvet plush all respond to traffic in different ways. The quality and density of the cushion is another factor that determines how well a carpet performs in traf c areas.

Even the way the pile yarns are twisted and how tightly packed they are in the carpet backing makes a difference in durability and cleanability.

An experienced cleaner will assess the condition of your carpet, asking questions such as, “How old is the carpet?”, “How was it cleaned in the past, and how often?”, “Was protector applied during the last cleaning?”, “How old are the spots, spills and stains, and have you tried anything to clean them?”

With all of these variables, it’s not an exact science. BUT there are some things we know about carpet, fibers, soil and stains that give us a clue as to what we can anticipate from the cleaning process. The most important consideration is the type of ber.

Wool carpet has excellent resilience, so those crushed traf c areas and furniture indentations have a good chance of coming out. Wool is more easily stained by proteins than other fibers, so some foods, pet urine and other protein sources like blood will be difficult to remove.

Olefin carpets don’t have the resiliency of wool, so high traf c areas tend to pack down and lose that fluffy texture over time. Ole n has excellent stain-resistance and color-fastness.

Stain-resist nylon has excellent resilience and good stain and soil repellency, so carpets made with nylon tend to be the best overall performers. However, depending on how the ber was dyed, Nylon may be bleached by some household chemicals or sunlight.

Polyester fibers have an affinity for oily soils, so food or petroleum grease spots will be more difficult to remove. But Polyester, like Olefin, is very resistant to stains and bleaching.

The bottom line is that how the carpet looks after cleaning will depend on some factors that are out of our control. But with an experienced cleaner you can be assured of the best results possible for your carpet.

 

January 2019 Client Newsletter

Here’s our January 2019 client newsletter.

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11 House Cleaning Secrets

Soil control is an important part of keeping your home clean and healthy. The Institute of Cleaning and Restoration Certification defines soil as any undesirable substance that is foreign to a surface. Practicing soil control means limiting the buildup of soil on surfaces. Limiting soil equals a clean and healthy home. Here are 11 tips to help you practice soil control.

1. Keep dirt outside by keeping all entry areas and garage floors swept and clean. Pressure wash walkways, porches and stairs leading to the entrances to your house. It takes 12 times more effort, time and money to remove soil from your home than it does to prevent it entering in the first place.

2. Remove dirt before it enters the house with door mats. Again, the idea is to limit the amount of soil that enters from outside. Use water resistant door mats made of non-absorbent, mold resistant fibers outside every entrance to your home.

3. Stop dirt at the door by adding another doormat just inside your home. This mat should be made of an absorbent material such as nylon, cotton or wool. Washable throw rugs work great, provided they don’t slide around or become a tripping hazard. Vacuum or wash the mat twice a week.

4. Keep outdoor shoes out of the house. Take off your shoes at the door and wear indoor shoes, slippers or socks around the house. Don’t go barefoot all the time; the natural oils on your feet attach to the carpet and attract soil.

5. Brush and groom your pets regularly – preferably outdoors.

6. Change your furnace filter every 30 days when it is in use. Opt for a high efficiency allergen-trapping filter – it will be $15-20 well-spent.

7. Keep your kitchen vent hood clean… and use it. These vents trap moisture, oils and odors that would otherwise end up in your carpet.

8. Use a bathroom vent. Humidity in the bathroom can lead to mold growth. Let the fan run 10 minutes after you shower or bathe.

9. Vacuum regularly.  This is the most important step in carpet maintenance. 74-79% of the soil in typical household carpet can be removed by regular vacuuming. If these dry soils are allowed to remain, some of them break down and oxidize, creating a perfect breeding ground for fungi, bacteria and unpleasant odors. Grittier soils adhere to sticky or oily residues on carpet fibers, causing abrasion and permanent damage. Regular vacuuming reduces these effects so carpets last longer.

10. Vacuum furniture. You should vacuum your upholstered furniture, drapery and blinds for the same reasons listed above. When you dust your furniture, do so gently, and slowly. It is best to do this with a duster attachment on your vacuum cleaner. Allow the dust to settle for an hour or so; then vacuum the carpet or floor.

11. Have your carpets and upholstery professionally cleaned at least once a year, at a minimum. Homes with more people, pets and especially those with young children, should be cleaned more frequently.

December 2018 Client Newsletter


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Why do Spots Come Back?

Naturally, you expect your carpets to look better after cleaning than before. So it may come as a surprise when some of the spots return. There are two reasons that this can happen: re-soiling from various residues and soil-wicking.

Re-soiling

Re-soiling is the result of new soil that is attracted to an oily or sticky residue on the carpet. One of the most common residues is left behind by common spot removers. Some of the products sold at grocery and home improvement stores can leave behind sticky, soil-attracting residues, especially when they are over-applied or not thoroughly rinsed.

Other residues that cause rapid resoiling are food grease, animal body oils, adhesive-tape residue, petroleum-based oils, moisturizing lotion, hair-spray, tanning oil, and sugar from spilled drinks. Once the visible soil is cleaned away from these areas, the carpet will look clean. However, the invisible residue acts as a soil magnet, leading to rapid re-soiling. This can take days or even a few weeks to occur.

Soil-wicking

Soil-wicking is another, common reason that spots reappear after cleaning.

Soilwicking is a result of how carpet is made and how it dries. Carpet is made up of multiple layers. Each of these layers plays a role in soil wicking. The yarns that you see in the face of the carpet are stitched into a thin, woven fabric called the primary backing. This primary backing can be seen by parting the fibers of the carpet and looking down between the rows of yarns.

During “normal” carpet cleaning, the intent is to clean the face yarns only. But sometimes spots, spills, and pet urine penetrate the primary backing. If you look at the back of the carpet, you will see the secondary backing, a coarser, stiffer woven material designed to give the carpet more strength and stability. The secondary backing creates a capillary action that can spread a spill out to a much larger area than you see on the surface. Just a 2-4 ounce spill can create a 12-inch diameter spot on the back of the carpet.

Between the primary and secondary backings, there is a layer of latex adhesive holding it all together. Some spills can penetrate into this layer and dry. These deposits can be “reactivated” by normal cleaning and wick to the surface of the carpet fibers during the normal drying process. These returning spots can be as much of a surprise to your carpet cleaning professional as they are to you.

The reason the spots return has to do with the mechanics of capillary action. As carpet dries, water evaporates from the tips of the carpet yarns, drawing some of the remaining moisture behind it. If there is any kind of soil or spill at the base of the yarns or in the backing, it too can be drawn up to the yarn tips. Unfortunately, while water readily evaporates, soils do not. So the spots that were hidden in the backing system are now at the top of the carpet where they can create a visibly noticeable spot. Correcting recurring spots may simply require a thorough rinse. Other times, specialized cleaning agents and more intensive cleaning techniques are needed.

While we do our best to prevent recurring spots, it does happen sometimes. If you ever see a spot come back after Professional Carpet Systems cleans your carpet, please call us as soon as possible so we can return and properly address the situation. Once we find the cause, we’ll use special techniques to correct it and leave your carpet spotless again.

November 2018 Client Newsletter

Here’s our November 2018 Client Newsletter.

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Food Spills on Carpet.

A Few Do’s and Don’ts

You vacuum twice a week, like clockwork. You ask everyone to take their shoes off at the door, leave your muddy shoes on the garage stoop, and toss your throw rugs in the washer every weekend. You do your level best to keep dirt outside where it belongs and pollutants inside your home to a minimum.

But no family is perfect.

Despite your best efforts at keeping spaghetti in the kitchen and dirt in the garden, no matter how careful you are, sooner or later it will happen. Someone will spill food or drink onto your carpet. You may see it the second it happens, or you may not spot it until it has dried and set. Either way, you will panic. You will fear that your beautiful carpet is ruined forever.

And you will wonder what to do.

What you need to know is that whether a simple spill comes out or becomes a permanent stain depends just as much on what you don’t do as what you do. Here are a few recommendations to help increase your chances of a successful stain treating outcome:

DO NOT rub or scrub the carpet with a towel or brush. This will distort the face yarns and cause permanent damage to the surface, which will only amplify the look of any stain.

DO pick up any chunks and then remove the excess liquid by gently blotting or scraping up as much of the spill as you can. If it is a liquid, such as coffee, wine or soda, use a white towel and blot up as much of the spill as possible. Keep blotting until your towel stops absorbing liquid.

DO NOT spread the spot. When scraping up thick spills, such as spaghetti sauce, work gently from the outside edges of the spot toward the middle. Scrape up as much as possible before using any spot cleaners.

DO call a reputable professional cleaning company as soon as possible. Experienced carpet cleaners will have a specialty spotter for just about any type of spill. In addition, they will have the equipment to promptly remove the stain and flush it with fresh water. Prompt professional attention is your best chance to remove spills without damaging the color or texture of your carpet.

DO NOT use cleaning agents from the grocery store. Most often, these products are low quality and ineffective. But even high quality products still need to be used carefully. A cleaning product must be carefully chosen for the type of spot and the kind of fabric that your carpet is made from. If you try to use the wrong product, or use it incorrectly, you may make the spill more difficult or even impossible for even the most experienced professional to remove.

While nobody can guarantee that every spot and stain will come out, by following these tips you will make cleaning up spots and spills much easier. You will be more likely to remove the stain completely, leaving your carpet looking good and helping your carpet to look good for years to come.